No one knows what goes on inside anyone’s head.

A FILM BY SASKIA RIFKIN, WRITTEN BY CATHERINE MAY LEVIN
WITH SUZANNE BERTISH, BARBARA ROSENBLAT, MUGGA, CATHERINE CURTIN, BEN LIVINGSTON, NOAH BEAN

Filmmaker’s note

When Catherine May Levin approached me with the script of MAD?, I was excited to discover that the character we had created together in “Can Hitler Happen Here?” was not done expressing herself. Miriam Kohen’s experience in the previous film had enabled me to explore the relationship between madness and genius. For this new film, I welcomed the opportunity once again to help articulate the unique perspective of this individualistic woman, and to delve further into her psyche. (Though this film is linked narratively to the previous one, and can be considered the middle section of what will likely be a trilogy, it also stands alone.)

I have always been drawn to representing marginal subjects and giving voice to what is considered taboo. The exploration of sexuality among older people and resistance to conformity so present in the first chapter of Miriam’s story is picked up again this new film, along with the additional themes of the fear of aging as loss of agency.

But perhaps the most compelling aspect of this film was the opportunity to invite viewers to step entirely into Miriam’s fantasies of murder and violence, and, in the process, consider the underlying connection between sex and death. The paradox between Miriam’s rough exterior and her longing for domestic intimacy is heartbreaking.

Shooting almost exclusively in one location—a geriatric psychiatric ward—enabled me to create a specific visual world, a hyper reality in which standard codes do not apply This places the viewer in the unstable position of being unable to say what is “real.” Are the dark things that unfold before us actually happening or a closing-in of Miriam’s madness and on our own senses. As always, in Levin’s scripts, the characters mirror the times in which they live. In MAD?, as in our current political climate, we are left doubting the truth of what is before our eyes.